Friday, October 29, 2010

Will County History

Will County Townships used to be dotted with one-room schoolhouses.

For example, this 1909 plat of Manhattan Township maps the location of several one-room schoolhouses:

http://will.ilgenweb.net/Maps/1909Large/1909-Manhattan.jpg
1909 Plat Map of Manhattan Township, Will County, Illinois


Will County News was recently fortunate to be given a copy of a circa 1938 photo of a one-room schoolhouse in Manhattan Township.  It looks like this was a fairly small class.  I like the Will County Map hanging on the wall:

Will County One-Room Schoolhouse




Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Interview with AJ Wilhelmi

by ann baskerville


Willcountynews interviewed State Senator AJ Wilhelmi, a Democrat who represents the 43rd State Senate District.  Wilhelmi is facing Republican Cedra Crenshaw in the November election.


Issue 1:What is Wilhelmi most proud of achieving as a State Senator


I asked Wilhelmi what 3 things he was most proud of accomplishing as a State Senator so far.


First, Wilhelmi said he was proud to have "had the honor of sponsoring the "Let Them Rest in Peace Act" in 2006 which prohibits hate groups from harassing families who are burying their loved one who died while serving our country in the military.  The bill was necessary because groups were protesting US military policy by showing up at service members' funerals and causing a disruption to the grieving family, protesting at a "completely and totally inappropriate time," Wilhelmi said.  The bill passed with overwhelming support and as he stood on the floor of the State Senate as the bill was passed, Wilhelmi said he "literally had chills up my spine" because he knew the bill would protect grieving families on one of the most difficult days of their life.


The bill: "protects grieving family members and friends by putting a 200-foot privacy zone between the funeral site and protestors who sing loudly, play music, chant, whistle, yell, or make any other type of disturbing noise. SB 1144 also prohibits protesters from displaying any visual images that convey fighting words or threats against any other person, and makes it illegal to knowingly obstruct a person’s entry or exit from a funeral site. Disruptive and inflammatory protests will be prohibited 30 minutes before a funeral, during a funeral, and 30 minutes after the funeral within that 200-foot privacy zone."


Secondly, Wilhelmi said he is proud to have helped pass the Intermodal Facility Promotions Act in 2009.  A public-private partnership, the Act provided incentives for the Union Pacific Intermodal Terminal and Centerpoint Intermodal Center, both in Joliet.   Wilhelmi said the two projects will employ 15,000 over the next 10 years.  Wilhelmi said the act also received support from Republicans, who said this is the kind of legislation we need.


Thirdly, Wilhelmi said he is proud to have fought for and supported legislation that supports: Pre-school education, K-12 education, After-School programs, and the Monetary Assistance Program, which provides financial assistance for college students so they can "get the education and training they need to get a job and support their family," Wilhelmi said.


Wilhelmi said the educational programs he fought for are all ultimately about "improving the community and providing our children with the education and tools they will need to meet the challenges of the 21st century."


When citizens ask Wilhelmi what he's been doing about jobs and education, Wilhelmi says he's been fighting for them and working to ensure all children in the community have access to great education that will prepare them to work in the global economy.  


Issue 2: Jobs


In terms of creating jobs, Wilhelmi said he sponsored legislation that provided Navistar with Recovery Zone Bonds, which was the incentive that led to Navistar's decision to locate in Will County.  The distribution center in New Lenox will create 150 direct-hire, permanent jobs that will pay union-level wages of approximately 40,000.  Furthermore, the Bonds were part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and if the funds were not used, they would have been lost.   


Wilhelmi also related the story of visiting an Iron Workers Retraining Program, which was supplying Iron Workers with the skills they need to install and maintain wind turbines.  This program, funded by a 300,000 grant, is important because it provides workers with new skills needed for working with new technology, Wilhelmi said. "Now more than ever we need job training and tax incentives to bring in job-creating businesses, if we eliminate the incentives, business will go elsewhere" Wilhelmi said.  For example, Wilhelmi said states like Texas and South Carolina offer businesses incentives to locate in their states, so Illinois has to offer incentives to these businesses to remain competitive.  


Wilhelmi pointed to the Ford Motor Company's recent decision to create 1200 new manufacturing jobs building the Ford Explorer south of Chicago.  Wilhelmi said Ford was looking at other states, and it was because of the incentive program offered by the state that Ford decided to locate in Illinois.  Wilhelmi said his opponent would call what Illinois did for Ford "a bribe", but Wilhelmi said every state offers tax incentives to businesses.  Wilhelmi said such public-private partnerships demonstrate how both sectors can work together to create jobs.   Wilhelmi points to Intel, which recently told the US Government it needs incentives to create jobs in the USA, or it will be forced to create jobs in India, China, and Mexico.  Wilhelmi said he does not want to see manufacturing jobs shipped to China or India or taken to Mexico.  




Wilhelmi said he is concerned about recent reports concerning warehouse work in Will County.  Wilhelmi said he has met with the Warehouse Workers for Justice, local ministers and the NAACP to discuss this issue.  Wilhelmi said he has met with community leaders in order to make sure that the jobs created in our distribution centers are good jobs.  Wilhelmi said, "We want to promote direct-hire, permanent, living-wage jobs."  Wilhelmi said he is committed to getting all stakeholders in the warehouse industry together in a roundtable forum where the issues and problems can be discussed and solutions can be created.   Wilhelmi says he is fortunate to have been given the support of the Illinois Manufacturer's Association and also the AFL-CIO.  Wilhelmi says it is important that Democrats and Republicans, and Labor and Business come together to create solutions to the problems our families face in these tough economic times.


Finally, in regards to the minimum wage Wilhelmi points to his vote to increase the minimum wage from 6.50 to 8.25.  Wilhelmi said that in these economic times, to talk about rolling back the minimum wage is "irresponsible and insensitive."  


Issue 3: Education


Wilhelmi said his view of education is in stark contrast to Cedra Crenshaw's.  Wilhelmi said that Crenshaw stated during an interview that she would be willing to vote for teacher layoffs and funding cuts.  Wilhelmi said "this is the wrong direction for Will County and it is the wrong direction for the State."  


Wilhelmi said he "can't think of a better investment than to invest in teachers and what they do for kids."


Wilhelmi also said his opponent stated she would not have voted for a capital bill that funded a new school for the Joliet Elementary School District.  Wilhelmi said a brand new school behind Gompers is not pork.  Wilhelmi said his opponent has aligned herself with Bill Brady and his plan to cut 10% across the board.  Wilhelmi is not in favor of cuts to education.


Wilhelmi said his opponent referred to public schools as indoctrination centers.  Wilhelmi said "I do not believe our public schools are indoctrination centers."


Wilhelmi said without training and skills, our children will not be able to compete in the global economy.   Wilhelmi also said education is a great investment.  He pointed to the fact that the police chiefs across the state believe in early childhood education, because every dollar spent there saves 7 in future criminal and social service expenses. 


Issue 4: Legislative Scholarships


Background: During a recent WJOL debate between Crenshaw and Wilhelmi, Crenshaw claimed Larry Walsh appointed Wilhelmi to his State Senate seat, and Wilhelmi then awarded Walsh's nephew Kevin Walsh a legislative scholarship.

What was said on the WJOL 
debate:
Wilhelmi: "My opponent has said that Larry Walsh appointed me to the Senate Seat.  That is not true....That is a falsehood.... Larry Walsh never appointed me to the Senate seat.... Secondly, Elwood's a small town, we get applications from Elwood, Manhattan, Joliet, Romeoville, Rockdale, Bolingbrook. The fact of the matter is, I have a very fair and balanced application process.  I have limited numbers of folks applying....and I don't think Larry's extended family should be penalized because they happen to be related to the county executive."

Scott Slocum (host): Ok. Cedra, any rebuttal to that?

Crenshaw: "I find it quite astounding that Senator Wilhemi sees no moral problem with giving a legislative scholarship to the person who did in fact appoint him to the Illinois State Senate.  And that therein shows the problem, one of the problems, in Illinois, in terms of the leadership or lack thereof that we have."

Wilhelmi: "Larry Walsh did not appoint me to the Senate Seat."

You can listen to the entire debate 
here, I have condensed it above for the sake of space.



I asked Wilhelmi to clarify the truth on this issue because, obviously, during the debate two opposite claims were made.


Wilhelmi said: "I was selected by a committee of 3 people: George Mushro, the late Dave Evans, and Tom Braxton.  14 candidates were interviewed and I ended up being selected."  With regards to Crenshaw's claim that Wilhelmi was appointed by Walsh and that Wilhelmi was involved in pay-to-play, Wilhelmi said: "It's just false, in fact, she knows it's false."

Halvorson sign defaced, Cedra Crenshaw sign cut up, disturbing trend

First a Debbie Halvorson sign was defaced on Rt. 45 in Kankakee County.

Now a Youtube video shows a Cedra Crenshaw sign cut up and dumped in a ditch:



This is ridiculous.  The elections are obviously very highly contested this year, but it is wrong to deface or destroy anyone else's property, period.  We have received reports from numerous other campaigns in the area that signs were stolen, knocked-down, or otherwise tampered with.

Is this the work of a few bad apples?  Teenagers having "fun"?  Maybe. 

The point is regardless of how you are going to vote in the election, we are all citizens of this area and need to do our part to maintain law and order.

Sunday, October 24, 2010

Interview with Cedra Crenshaw

by ann baskerville

Will County News recently sat down with Republican candidate for the 43rd State Senate seat Cedra Crenshaw.  Crenshaw faces incumbent Democrat AJ Wilhelmi in this November's election.



Issue One: Claims regarding Legislative Scholarships 
Background: During a recent WJOL debate between Crenshaw and Wilhelmi, Crenshaw claimed Larry Walsh appointed Wilhelmi to his State Senate seat, and Wilhelmi then awarded Walsh's nephew Kevin Walsh a legislative scholarship.

What was said on the WJOL debate:
Wilhelmi: "My opponent has said that Larry Walsh appointed me to the Senate Seat.  That is not true....That is a falsehood.... Larry Walsh never appointed me to the Senate seat.... Secondly, Elwood's a small town, we get applications from Elwood, Manhattan, Joliet, Romeoville, Rockdale, Bolingbrook. The fact of the matter is, I have a very fair and balanced application process.  I have limited numbers of folks applying....and I don't think Larry's extended family should be penalized because they happen to be related to the county executive."

Scott Slocum (host): Ok. Cedra, any rebuttal to that?

Crenshaw: "I find it quite astounding that Senator Wilhemi sees no moral problem with giving a legislative scholarship to the person who did in fact appoint him to the Illinois State Senate.  And that therein shows the problem, one of the problems, in Illinois, in terms of the leadership or lack thereof that we have."

Wilhelmi: "Larry Walsh did not appoint me to the Senate Seat."

You can listen to the entire debate here, I have condensed it above for the sake of space.

Crenshaw also has a page on her website where she outlines what she calls Wilhelmi's "Pay to Play Deals."

I asked Cedra to clarify the truth regarding this issue, because, obviously, during the debate the candidates made completely opposite claims.

Crenshaw said, "The truth is exactly what I said during the debate."  Crenshaw said Wilhelmi rewarded supporters and donors by giving legislative scholarships to supporters' children.  Crenshaw said Wilhelmi gave scholarships to the children of two Village of Manhattan trustees.  Crenshaw said State Rep. Jack McGuire also awarded scholarships to these kids.  Crenshaw said, "And what's so shocking to me is he saw no moral problem with that."

When I asked whether it was Larry Walsh himself who appointed Wilhelmi to the Senate seat or if it was the Democratic Party of Will County who appointed Wilhelmi, Crenshaw said that was an issue of semantics, and that everyone knows that it was Walsh who appointed Wilhelmi to the seat.

Ultimately, Crenshaw said, the legislative scholarships are "an incubator for corruption".

Issue Two: The State Budget
Next, I asked Cedra Crenshaw to elaborate on her plan to get the State Budget under control.  Crenshaw said there is room to "cut waste, mismanagement, and corruption."  Crenshaw is in favor of a line-by-line forensic audit of the budget.  Crenshaw said, for example, there are 150 million dollars currently not accounted for in the Illinois Tollway Budget.  Crenshaw said a forensic audit of all aspects of the state budget--down to the transaction level--would not only account for that money, but also serve as evidence for possible prosecution of anyone who was mismanaging state money.  The forensic audit would help hold people accountable, Crenshaw said.

Crenshaw is in favor of accountability and transparency with regards to the State Budget.  When asked whether she would be in favor of putting government transactions online where anyone could see them, Crenshaw said she knows some states put their checkbooks online, and she would support an action like that in Illinois.

Crenshaw says that for a 60 million dollar investment in the forensic audit, the state could save 3-5 billion dollars, which is a "great Return on Investment," said Crenshaw.

Crenshaw also wants to cut pork from the Capital Bill.  The 31 billion captial bill signed by Quinn contains too much pork, Crenshaw said.  Crenshaw identified the following as examples of waste in the Capital Bill: 500,000 for a Baseball Hall of Fame, 5,000,000 for the Black Ensemble Theatre, and 40,000,000 for Chicago State, a state college with a 16% graduation rate.

Crenshaw proposes cutting the pork and using that money to bridge the deficit and also pay schools that are currently owed money by the State of Illinois, schools such as the Joliet Township High School School District and the Valley View School District.

Issue Three: Job Creation in Illinois
When it comes to creating a favorable environment for job growth in Illinois, Crenshaw says there is a basic philosophical difference between herself and her opponent.  Crenshaw believes the private sector creates jobs, while Wilhelmi believes the government should have a much bigger role in job creation.

Crenshaw says she wants to create a favorable environment for job creation in Illinois by following the following principles: fiscal responsibility, low taxes, reasonable regulation, accountability, transparency, and limited government.  Furthermore, Crenshaw advocates government that is responsive to the needs of small business owners because small businesses create jobs.

For example, Crenshaw said she spoke with an electrical engineer who also does work in Arizona and Texas.  The engineer told Crenshaw that while it takes months to get a permit in Illinois, he can get the same permit in only days in other states.    If the permit involves blueprints, Crenshaw said it can take the engineer 5-6 months to get the permit and up to 2 years if the blueprint involves a road.  The engineer said in the other states, the government workers who process the permits treat him like a customer and quickly process his paperwork, an experience he hasn't had in Illinois, Crenshaw said.

Furthermore, Crenshaw related the story of a contractor she met who works in Will County.  The contractor said most of his business in Illinois is government business while most of his business in Indiana is private business.  Furthermore, the contractor told Crenshaw that "if we don't change politicians in November....and change the taxing environment, the regulatory environment, and the legal environment in Illinois, that contractor said he is moving to Indiana."

Crenshaw says, in regards to these two examples, "People who risk money, time, and skills need to be treated as friends to the state, because they create jobs and revenue."

Issue 4: Education
 I asked Crenshaw her reaction to an endorsement letter from AFT Local 604 that AJ Wilhelmi has posted on his website.  The letter claims Crenshaw will "gut public education as we know it"and implores people not to "let Senator Wilhelmi become victimized by the anti-incumbent fever being spread by those advocating an ultra conservative agenda."

Firstly, Crenshaw said the "letter is shameful in the way they have distorted" the facts.  Crenshaw said: "I am pro-teacher, my husband is a teacher, my kids go to public schools."  Furthermore, Crenshaw said "If the kids had a union, I'd be endorsed by the kids."

Crenshaw said, "We're not funding education right now, right now when he's in office."  Crenshaw said Wilhelmi voted to gut the pension, he skipped payments to the pension system.

Crenshaw supports the Meeks proposal to provide vouchers for children attending the weakest public schools in Chicago.  Crenshaw says charter schools not only provide a good option for children actually choosing to attend the charter schools, they also "drive-up competition in the public schools" and result in better education for all children.    More information on Crenshaw's ideas on educational policy can be found here.

Regarding the use of the word "victimized" in the letter, when asked whether the use of this word was condescending to the voters of the 43rd District--in that it implies that if Wilhelmi were to lose he will have been in some sense "victimized" by voters who were persuaded by an "anti-incumbent fever" rather than voters who were simply made a choice--Crenshaw said that is was condescending to the voters and that if Wilhelmi were to lose, "instead of being victimized, he would be held accountable."

Finally, when asked to discuss some of the goals she would pursue if elected, Crenshaw said she would be happy to "work with any lawmaker--regardless of party--to balance our state budget."   She would also be happy to "work with anyone to reduce the size of government."  Crenshaw said she would be happy to work with Democrat Emily McAsey to get rid of the legislative scholarship program.  Crenshaw said she would also be happy to work with Democrat James Meeks to "increase quality of education."

Saturday, October 23, 2010

Adam Baumgartner, Republican candidate for State Senate, 40th Distirct

Adam Baumgartner explained why he is running for the Illinois State Senate during the Tax Town Hall held by Adam Baumgartner and Nick Been.  The 40th State Senate District includes parts of Cook, Will, Kankakee, and Iroquois County.  Baumgartner's opponent is Democrat Toi Hutchinson.


Adam Baumgartner explains why is running for State Senate and some of his positions:

 

Beautiful Fall Colors at Gerdes Grove, Twelve Mile Grove in Wilton Center, Illinois

Beautiful fall colors are on display at Gerdes Grove and the Laughton Preserve in Wilton Center, Illinois.  The preserves are part of the Will County Forest Preserve District.

 Laughton Preserve, Wilton Center, Illinois
 Laughton Preserve, Wilton Center, Illinois

 Laughton Preserve, Wilton Center, Illinois

Gerdes Grove, Wilton Center, Illinois

According to the Forest Preserve District of Will County's website:

"Laughton Preserve began with the District's acquisition of an 8-acre parcel from the Gerdes family, and has grown to 430 acres from extensive acquisitions in the 1990s and in 2006. 

The preserve contains approximately 2 miles of Forked Creek and has been left largely undisturbed, as it protects a remnant of the historic Twelve Mile Grove (a prairie grove 12 miles along the road from Joliet to Danville), portions of the 1832 Ce-Na-Ge-Wine and Joseph Laughton Reservations, and the historic Wallingford Settlement in Wilton Center on Joliet Road.

The only access area is Gerdes Grove, which features an old Civilian Conservation Corps picnic shelter for public use. Come to Laughton Preserve for a great picnic area and enjoy the land as it used to be!"


 

Saturday, October 16, 2010

Fall Colors along the Wauponsee Glacial Trail in Symerton, Illinois



 Fall Colors of the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie along the Wauponsee Glacial Trail in Symerton, Illinois

Fall Colors and corn crib along the Wauponsee Glacial Trail in Symerton, Illinois


Fall Colors and old railroad ties along the Wauponsee Glacial Trail in Symerton, Illinois

Fall Colors along the Wauponsee Glacial Trail in Symerton, Illinois, looking into the Midewin National
Tallgrass Prairie

Friday, October 15, 2010

Debbie Halvorson believes no family farm or small business should ever be lost due to estate tax

Responding to a recent willcountynewsviewpoints post, Greg Bales--New Media Director for Debbie Halvorson for Congress--provided Congresswoman Halvorson's position on the estate tax--


"Congresswoman Halvorson believes that no family farm or small business should ever be lost because of the estate tax. That is why she is proud to co-sponsor H.R. 3905 the Estate Tax Relief Act.  

This bipartisan bill raises the estate tax exemption level from $3.5 million to $5 million and indexes the exemption level to inflation, which would prevent the estate tax from hitting small businesses and family farms. 

The legislation also reduces the top estate tax rate from 45% to 35%. These changes are phased in over 10 years to minimize the impact on the deficit. 

Congresswoman Halvorson believes that Congress should act on this legislation immediately in order to prevent the estate tax rate from rising back to 55% in 2011. "


With an exemption of 5 million and a hypothetical family farm of 300 acres which is valued at 10,000 an acre, that farm could be passed down without any inheritance tax because the 300 X 10,000 is 3,000,000, which is obviously under the proposed 5 million exemption.  

Monday, October 11, 2010

Another Day of Beautiful Fall Colors in Will County

Photos of beautiful fall colors in Will County!

 Wauponsee Glacial Trail over Prairie Creek
 Wauponsee Glacial Trail
 Wauponsee Glacial Trail near Manhattan, Illinois
 Looking west from the Wauponsee Glacial Trail
Wauponsee Glacial Trail near the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie

Sunday, October 10, 2010

Enjoy the Beautiful Fall Colors in Will County!

Now is a great time to head outdoors and enjoy beautiful fall colors in Will County!

Two great places to enjoy the warm colors of autumn are the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie and the Wauponsee Glacial Trail.

Here are some photos taken from the Wauponsee Glacial Trail between Manhattan and Symerton, Illinois:

 Wauponsee Glacial Trail, between Manhattan and Symerton, Illinois
 Fall Colors along the Wauponsee Glacial Trail

Fall colors along the Wauponsee Glacial Trail, bridge over Prairie Creek near Manhattan, Illinois

The Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie is also a great resource for Will County.  Many hiking and biking trails are currently open to the public.

Photos from the Bailey Bridge Trail inside the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie:


 Bailey Bridge Trail, Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie
 Klingler Cemetery gate inside the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie
Hedge apple on the Bailey Bridge Trail in the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie

Sign on the Bailey Bridge Trail in the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie

Midewin is hosting a variety of fun, family-friendly activities in October.

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Interview with Toi Hutchinson, Illinois State Senator, 40th District

by ann baskerville

State Senator Toi Hutchinson, a Democrat,  represents the Illinois 40th State Senate District, one of the most economically and topographically diverse districts in the state:
http://www.toihutchinson.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/illinois-state-40th-district.jpg
map from toihutchinson.com

Hutchinson was appointed to the 40th State Senate seat on January 5, 2009 to serve the remainder of
Congresswoman Debbie Halvorson's unexpired term.  Prior to her appointment, Hutchinson served as
Halvorson's chief of staff.  Hutchinson is being challenged this November by Republican Adam Baumgartner.

Hutchinson has heard one consistent concern from residents of the 40th District: "jobs, jobs
jobs, jobs, jobs."  Hutchinson's conversations with constituents have focused her determination 
to pass legislation that brings jobs to the 40th district.  For example, Hutchinson said she is  
extremely proud of her work in passing the Illiana Expressway legislation because it is projected to 
create 4,300 short-term construction jobs and 13,800 long-term jobs in Northeastern Illinois in the 30 years
following construction.   She said the project will also lay the groundwork for future economic development in 
the 40th District.

Hutchinson is also eager to work to restore the public trust in government.  She says public trust in government
has declined because  "the public trust has been violated so much in the past." Hutchinson believes in increasing 
openness and transparency in government and also focusing on accountability, analyzing how well state-funded
programs accomplish their goals, and give taxpayers a return on investment.  Hutchinson said it is important to restore 
public trust in government because, "Government can be an extremely strong job creator" and because "a healthy, 
vibrant capitalistic system requires government to provide checks and balances."


When asked her opinion regarding a recent survey of warehouse workers in Will County that found 62% of 
workers were temps making poverty-level wages, Hutchinson said the government does have a role in "investing in,
protecting, and training out workers.  Hutchinson cited the Preamble to the Illinois State Constitution, which states
a duty to "provide opportunity for the fullest development of the individual", and said "the people in this district are our
biggest asset" and that it is important to have smart regulations that protect people.


Hutchinson was involved in work that brought American Recovery and Reinvestment Act dollars to Hopkins Park for
the Sandstone Hills rent-to-own housing community.  29 rent-to-own homes are being built with Recovery Act dollars 
in the Pembroke Township community.  Hutchinson said the project was the result of years of work by local residents.  
Hutchinson was handed a binder of information about the project by a woman who told Hutchinson, "This is my dream
and I'm putting it in your hands."  Hutchinson said Sandstone Hills is "an extremely important project to people in the area...
a home is not just a roof over your head, it provides a sense of belonging and a pride of ownership, something people can take 
care of."





Sandstone Hills in Hopkins Park, Illinois


Hutchinson is interested in local, organic farms in Pembroke Township, such as the farms recently 
featured in a Chicago Reader article. Hutchinson worked on legislation that would allow small farms to
accept state food stamp benefits. Hutchinson is also interested in working to help interested farmers go through
the organic certification process in an efficient manner. Hutchinson says these small, family-owned businesses
get to the root of Midwestern values embodied in the phrase, "If you give a man a fish, he eats for one day. Teach
a man to fish, he eats for a lifetime." Hutchinson believes it is important to understand the history of the Pembroke
Township area. She does not think outsiders should approach the area with an attitude of "this is what we want
to do for you poor people." Hutchinson believes in self-determination and seeking input from all stake-holders.
Hutchinson said she is interested in "hand-ups, not hand outs."


Video-taped interview with Toi Hutchinson: